The Last Viking (Part One)

Posted: November 16, 2015 in boardgames, Gaming, Lifestyle/Culture, Other
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This is my report from the Come to a King Megagame that took place on Saturday, 14th November 2015. You may have read reports of mine from previous games – Watch the Skies 2 & Watch the Skies 3. This post will mainly focus on the narrative of my personal game, and so there will be a lot of context and wider elements missing.

Due to length, this will be split into three parts, with the final post finishing with some thoughts on the most salient points in terms of feedback.

Thanks once again to Andrew for putting on a great day, and thank you to Control and everyone else involved.

Come to a King was a very different prospect than WTS on many levels – it was smaller, for one thing, with no more than 50 – 70 people in attendance (I didn’t actually count so that’s entirely made up), and instead of teams representing nations, you played a specific character in 11th century England, a time that saw a lot of change and upheaval across the British Isles. It was down to you to make your own alliances and make your own mark in the world.

As a Lord, you owned lands that you could tax & invest in, raise troops from, and there were a number of other actions you could do as well, but you were limited to four actions a turn. Wars could be fought, Lands seized and Towns besieged, but high level play revolved around the politics of Titles and Kingdoms. There were several Kingdoms in existence at the start of the game, and many that could be created either through politicking or by the sword. Kings and other prominent Lords held councils, and it was down to everyone else to decide who to show fealty to.

The scene: two Kings claimed ownership over the throne of England – Athelred the Ill-Counselled in exile in Normandy, with King Swegan of Denmark having just usurped his crown. There was discontent in the North, which had always been rebellious and independent minded. The Welsh were at each other’s throats, as usual, and a massive civil brewed in Ireland as High King Brian tried to keep the Irish Kingdoms in line. King Malcolm in Scotland was trying to keep his modest Scottish Kingdom together, surrounded as he was by unruly Norse neighbours ( namely me), disgruntled Britons in Strathclyde and ambitious Lords from within.

I played Jarl Gilli, a Norse/Irish Viking Lord located mainly in the Hebrides in the Irish Sea, just off the coast of Scotland. What did I want? I was a pagan, clinging to the edges of a Christian world hungry for power, glory and a good woman to call my own. I had friends. I had enemies.

I was a Viking, Lord of the Isles, and this is my story.

Lord of Land & Sea

All I knew prior to the game was that I was Lord of the ‘Northern’ and ‘Southern’ Isles (an abstraction of the Hebrides and other island bits just off the coast of Scotland), and that I would probably have some kind of relationship with Jarl Sigurd of the Orkney Islands, who was my nominal superior according to the one piece of text that references my character.

When I arrived, I found that I was indeed Lord of the Isles, although I only had direct control over the Northern Isles as an NPC held the Southern Isles. Still, since I held the ‘Title’, I got a bonus gold each turn. Sigurd was indeed my ally and sort-of overlord, and my enemies were the Lord of Galloway, and Owen of Strathclyde (who was played by my best-friend, which scuppered all the plans we’d made on the train ride up). I also owned some land in Argyll, on the Scottish mainland, which was a pleasant surprise, although it did tie my destiny more to Scotland than I had anticipated.

The ‘turn’ is split into two parts – a Council phase and then a four successive action phases. The turn is meant to represent a year. Going to a council means you’re showing fealty to whoever is holding the council, but it also means you can benefit from whatever policies the King/Great Lord wants to enact for the year and it’s the easiest way to get lands, titles etc…

I wasn’t sure where to go first turn –a vague plan to start land-grabbing in Scotland meant that I couldn’t attend the council there (otherwise I would be penalised by the game), and there was no council local to the Irish Sea, my official starting location. I decided to attend the Rebel Irish council just to feel out the situation there, and because Sigurd, my boss, historically helped the Rebel Irish and Danes fight the High King.

It was a bit bleak since I was only person to turn up, but we had a nice chat and I bid him good luck when all was done.

Back in Argyll, it turned out I shared the province with an NPC who owned the other bit of land. I wanted him to recognise me as his overlord and pay me dues, but a conversation with control determined that the only way to really make the most of this was to seize his lands for myself, which I did. This got some of the other lords of Alba (the primary Kingdom in Scotland) a little bit concerned; however Jarl Sigurd (who was tied to the King of Alba through marriage) managed to convince them that if they gave me what I wanted I wouldn’t cause any more trouble.

I cared not who sat on the throne of Alba – I was Viking! I took what I wanted, but I was also smart enough to jump through some hoops where necessary. Next turn I showed fealty to the King and swore to keep the peace, and in return he formally made me Jarl of all Argyll, something that had specific in-game benefits. There were grumblings from Strathclyde, who neighboured Argyll and was played by my friend. We were enemies, so he was playing up his role and trying to be a dissenting voice.

The Abbot for the Scotland map, whose name I forget, also objected since I was a Pagan, but I said I would let Christian Priests walk freely through my land. I wouldn’t convert myself, as my faith was my own, but I wouldn’t stop people choosing freely either.

It was handy having Jarl Sigurd as an ally in Scotland, and Tim was generally a really nice guy. It would be awkward when I came to betray him, as my briefing suggested I should eventually, but for the moment we were allies and we plotted the fate of Alba together while we prepared for the coming year.

End of Part One | Read Part TwoRead Part Three

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Comments
  1. […] This is Part Two of my report from the recent Megagame ‘Come to a King’. For more information please read Part One. […]

  2. […] This is the third part in my report of the Come to a King Megagame. For more information, please read Part One. […]

  3. […] I woke up on March 19th, 202whateveritwas from a bad dream. In that dream I thought I was the Chief of Defence for Nigeria and that I’d just spent countless months cleaning up poo. I’d been having a lot of dreams like that recently – one where I was the Chancellor for Germany, and another where I was a Viking. […]

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